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Power Quality Affects Teacher Well-being and Student Behavior in Three Minnesota Schools

Author(s): Dr. Magda Havas, BSc, Ph.D. (Professor of Environmental and Resource Studies – Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario, Canada), Angela Olstad (Melrose-Mindoro Elementary School – Melrose, WI USA)
Publication: Science of the Total Environment
Publisher: Elsevier B.V.
Date: April 21, 2008

Abstract:
Results: Dirty electricity was reduced by more than 90% in the three schools and during this period teacher health improved as did student behavior in the middle/elementary schools. Headaches, general weakness, dry eyes/mouth, facial flushing, asthma, skin irritations, overall mood including depression and anxiety improved significantly among staff. Of the 44 teachers who participated 64% were better, 30% were worse, and 6% did not change. Behavior of high school students did not improve but elementary/middle school students were more active in class; more responsive, more focused; had fewer health complaints; and had a better overall learning experience.

Conclusions: Dirty electricity in schools may be adversely affecting wellbeing of teachers and behavior of their students, especially younger students in middle and elementary school. Power line filters improve power quality and may also protect those who are sensitive to this energy. Work on electric and magnetic field metrics with and without Stetzer filters urgently needs to be carried out to determine just what characteristics of the dirty electricity may be interacting with the people.

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